Singapore Outward Bound School

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A couple of weeks ago, we were invited by the friendly people of National Youth Council to the open house of Outward Bound Singapore (OBS) located at Pulau Ubin.

We have been to Pulau Ubin many times but this was our first time stepping foot onto the premises of OBS. This idyllic island is our favourite weekend getaway. Its gentle wilderness and natural beauty always has something to make everyone happy.

Last year, we were invited to the same event but missed it because we thought we could reach the place via Changi Point Jetty Terminal, the usual place where we board the bumboats. We ended up cycling round the island, coming really close but was stopped by barricades that went around the premises of the school. We missed the event but managed to explore a different part of the island.

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We later found out that OBS can only be reached via the Punggol Point Jetty Terminal, which was like an exclusive jetty terminal built for Outward Board Singapore. The ferry which took us across was much larger than the bumboats at Changi Point and it brought us right to the doorstep of the school. The sight that welcomed us was like a huge holiday resort tucked away from the bustling city life.

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We met our instructor for the day, a fine young man who had graduated with a degree in Computer Science but soon realised that a desk bound job was not quite meant for him. He quit his job in the corporate world and became an instructor with OBS. It’s been 7 years now and apart from not having to put on office wear when he goes to work, he loves interacting, coaching and leading the youths. He loves the great outdoor and he obviously loves what he is doing now. Despite having to take a hefty pay cut in the beginning, he is now happily married with his own home. His story is an inspiring one that involves knowing what he wants in life and having the courage to pursue it.

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During the open house, we were introduced to orienteering where we learned basic map reading and navigation skills . We had an orienteering race where we ran around the campus, tapping our handheld devices at the various checkpoints. My husband and I decided to go as a team and my 12 year old was set on beating us in the race. We made some mistakes in the beginning and ended up having to back track to the starting point thus wasting some time and energy. It was a fun activity which combines both physical and mental challenges as concentration and alertness were required to read the map and make decisions on the go.

Shown below is “The Tripod”, where we tried our hand at crossing various nerve wracking obstacles while suspended in mid air. This has to be the highlight of the program.

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As a student, I was never in any adventure club. I grew up playing girly stuff and I have never broken a bone. I wasn’t the adventurous type and I was never good at pushing my limits. The first time I tried to cross a wooden plank 3 metres off the ground during school orientation, my legs turned to jelly and I had to be brought down soaked in cold sweat, shivering. I concluded that I had acrophobia, the fear of heights.

So you can imagine how terrifying it was for me to attempt these obstacles. It was like revisiting an old monster, fear.

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Above is a ladder bridge suspended in mid air. It swayed at every movement you made (even when you were trembling or breathing hard). You could either go with the swing and make your way across FAST (like what my boy did) or take every step slowly, exerting every ounce of core muscle you have to try to minimize the swinging. I did just that with both hands holding onto the rope, as if for dear life, wobbling my way across. I think I made some of the audience including the belayers sweat. The intense exhilaration of victory, of beating the fear monster upon taking the final step towards the other end of the bridge was indescribable.

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The boys went on to try out various obstacles set around the Tripod. My 12 year old was pretty nimble at balancing his way across the various obstacles despite being his first time trying something as exciting as these. These activities helped to build confidence, balance and also teamwork because you have to trust the belayer to hold you should you lose your footing.

Apart from seeing their mom scared shitless, this scrabble game we played at the end of the event more or less summed up their experience.

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We were really excited about MOE’s recent announcement that soon all Secondary 3 students will get a chance to go on a 5 day camp at OBS as part of our new National Outdoor Adventure Education Masterplan. Unfortunately, this will only be launched in 2020 which means my elder boy will miss it. It is a pity that not all students will get a chance to experience what OBS has to offer.

I think this is definitely a right step forward for Singapore. What our children will go through in OBS is not that different from what they will go through in life. Facing an obstacle at OBS is like facing an obstacle in real life where they will find themselves out of their comfort zones. They will have two choices. They can overcome their fear of the unknown and the new, learn to trust and work with people on their team, and muster the courage to cross that ladder bridge. Or they can turn around and quit.

Yes, the PSLE is important. But it is no more relevant to succeeding in life than the skills you can learn at OBS. Bravo to MOE for championing this cause.

 
 

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Will Changes In PSLE T-Score Changes Anything ?

There has been much anxiety over MOE’s announcement that the Primary School Leaving Examination (PSLE) will be replaced with wider scoring bands from 2021. The change hopes to reduce the over-emphasis on academic results and encourage students to focus on their own learning rather than competing to do better than their peers. The Direct Scheme Admission (DSA) will also be reviewed to realign it with its original intent, ie to recognise achievements and talents in other areas such as arts and sports instead of general academic ability.

Concerned parents now wonder how they should change their strategies to tackle the high-stakes PSLE examinations in order to secure places for kids in highly sought after secondary schools. Should they start grooming their kids at 3 years old to become the next Tiger Wood or should they continue to throw in money into the billion dollar tuition industry.

Let’s take a look at whether MOE’s past policies had been successful in achieving its desired outcome of changing behaviours.

In 2005, MOE implemented its Teach Less Learn More (TLLM) initiative to shift focus from quantity to quality, and from efficiency to choice in learning with the objective for educators to teach better, engage students and prepare them for life, rather than to teach for tests and examinations.

Ex-Education Minister Mr Heng Swee Keat in 2015 said that

Since the introduction of the “teach less, learn more” policy in 2005, up to 20 per cent of content has been reduced from syllabuses implemented across the primary, secondary and pre-university levels. There has also been a shift away from rote learning, as policymakers respond to concerns over the amount of content being taught in the schools and the cramming that students do before examinations.

So how has TLLM affected our children?

My elder boy is sitting for PSLE this year and his younger brother will be affected by the new PSLE banding system in 2021. He started Primary 1 this year and came home everyday with more homework than his elder brother did 5 years ago. I had to write to the teacher to find out whether it was a case where he couldn’t finish his work in class or has the syllabus been changed and the workload increased. The teacher assured me that he was coping well.

If teaching less means reducing the content in textbooks, then yes. My sons’ school no longer uses textbooks for English and Science. They plunge straight into doing worksheets. During Parent Teacher Meeting (PTM) the explanation given was that the focus now is on application of concepts.

Aren’t new concepts grasped through reading? Have their Science textbooks become irrelevant? If so, why are they still in the booklist? It appears to me that the school no longer value and encourage reading. It is easier to just teach students to answer questions because if you go through enough worksheets, you can probably score well for exams.

Is that how we teach less and learn more? Is that the desired outcome that MOE hopes to achieve or somewhere along the line, execution has failed.

Pasi Sahlberg, in his book,Finnish Lessons, What can the world learn from Educational change in Finland? wrote that the Teach Less Learn More and Test Less Learn More in the Finnish education system is a paradox. He wrote,

The Finnish experience challenges the typical logic of educational development that tries to fix lower-than-expected student performance by increasing the length of education and duration of teaching.

There appears to be very little correlation between intended instruction hours in public education and resulting student performance, as assessed by PISA study.

Finnish teachers on average teach about 4 lessons daily, which work out to be 3 hours of teaching daily (as compared to 5 hours in American schools). This leave them time to plan, learn and reflect on teaching with other teachers..

Finnish educators don’t believe that doing more homework necessarily leads to better learning especially if pupils are working on routine and intellectually unchallenging drills, as school homework assignments unfortunately often are.

It has been a decade since MOE implemented TLLM and now we are a nation of anxious parents, stressed out kids with a billion dollar tuition industry. So will scrapping PSLE T-score reduce the over-emphasis on academic results and encourage students to focus on their own learning rather than competing to do better than their peers.

To these changes, my 12 year old responded matter-of-factly that parents will still be as kiasu (competitive), students will still be as stressed out and teachers will still drill them with more worksheets. There will still be Continual Assessment (CA), Semestral Assessment (SA) and PSLE, everyone will still be studying to score well for tests and examinations. Every year, students in his school are grouped into different classes according to test and exam scores.

He has gone through the last 6 years without tuition or enrichment classes except for Chinese. He started Chinese tuition last year when he was half way through Primary 5 after missing the subject for a whole year when we were living overseas. Apart from completing his homework from school, he spends most of his free time reading and doing the things he like, not worksheets or assessment books. Even so, it was painfully clear that good scores for tests and exams are important because it determines which class he goes to and they are told often enough in school which are the best class and which are the best students. Getting good grades and doing well for PSLE is a mindset that is not just ingrained in parents and students but educators. It is what drives everyone’s behavior and creates the race-to-the-top mentality.

Ability-driven education is believed to be a key feature behind Singapore’s success in education. Students are segregated based on perceived ability or achievement. Since the 1970s we have had streaming but later replaced by subject banding that we are still using today. We have Gifted Education Programs (GEP) where different curriculum and teaching methods are used for exceptionally bright students. Our system requires students to be frequently tested so that they can be grouped and sorted according to their abilities. Tests, exams and assessments form the backbone of our education system.

But what is wrong with assessment and testing?

There are 2 main types of assessments, Formative assessment and Summative assessment.

Formative assessment, is a range of formal and informal assessment procedures conducted by teachers during the learning process in order to modify teaching and learning activities to improve student attainment. It typically involves qualitative feedback (rather than scores) for both student and teacher that focuses on the details of content and performance.

Summative assessment refers to the assessment of participants where the focus is on the outcome of a program. This contrasts with formative assessment which summarizes the participants’ development at a particular time.

I believe what we have in Singapore are summative assessments. PSLE takes place at the end of Primary school. It assess what has been learned and how well it was learned. Grades are given and students are sorted based on their grades into different secondary schools.

In his book, Pasi Sahlberg wrote,

Testing itself is not a bad thing. Problems arise when they become higher in stakes and include sanctions to teachers or schools as a consequence of poor performance.
Teachers tend to redesign their teaching according to these tests, give higher priority to those subjects that are tested, and adjust teaching methods to drilling and memorizing information rather than understanding knowledge.

Appropriate testing helps identify areas needing improvement but high-stakes standardized examination, such as PSLE, prevent real learning and has led our teachers to focus their attention on helping students do well for test, at the expense of developing every student’s full potential.

Our ability-driven education system is achieved through tracking, sorting, streaming, or ability grouping. Initially touted as a way of tailoring instruction to the diverse needs of students, research has shown that tracking has instead limited the more beneficial opportunities to high-track students and denying these benefits to lower-tracked students. It has widened the achievement gap between the high and low achievers over the years and led to inequitable educational outcomes.

The Finnish education system has abolished streaming in the mid-a980s and made learning expectations the same for all students. This meant that all pupils, regardless of their abilities or interests, studied in the same classes. PISA survey showed that Finland had the smallest performance variations between schools in reading, mathematics, and sciences ie. smallest achievement gap between low and high achievers.

Our education system based on meritocracy has worked for us for the last 50 years. It has created a gap between the high achievers and the low achievers and a widened income gap. The wealthier families can now give their children an edge through tuition and enrichment, leading to exams such as the Primary School Leaving Examination (PSLE) no longer being ‘the level playing field’ that they once were. And this will perpetuate in a system which focuses on standardized tests and high-stakes examinations.

Our ex-Education Minister Mr Heng said that it will take some time for parents to change the mindset that certain school will help their child to succeed later. And current Education Minister Mr Ng noted that ‘there is a deeply ingrained mindset that the PSLE is a very high-stakes exam. Many perceive that a child’s PSLE T-score at the age of 12 determines his or her success and pathway in life.’

A good culture does not happen by chance. Neither will mindsets change over time.

Yes we need a mindset change, both parents and educators. More importantly we need policymakers to create structures and policies to enable the parents and educators to think and do things differently. We need them to create a system that can help to bridge the social gap between the haves and the have-nots.

Meanwhile, it is not impossible but it takes iron will and courage for parents to move away from the herd mentality, to opt out from the race and give their children the space and time to find their true passion and the kind of childhood they deserve.

 

Here are some thoughts on education and parenting by some mother bloggers
Lyn Lee’s The Singapore ‘Education Condition’
Michelle Choy’s No More T-Score. No what?
June Yong’s Parenting from a place of enough
 
 

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A Birthday Party At The Pool

Malcolm turned 12 and we had a pool party celebration for him last weekend. We had 10 boys over and we basically let them run wild.

Through the years of party planning, I learned that I usually risk losing my voice and sanity trying to have the kids do my bidding. A handheld speaker would definitely come in handy but it really needn’t be too complicated. The kids are usually happy just having their friends around to play with.

This time round we brought down our pool noodles, a ball and a frisbee and the boys played for 3 hours while I sat under the shade, with music plugged into my ears, chilling out. It was a pity that his younger brother fell sick and couldn’t join them at the pool but thankfully my husband was around to help babysit him.

I found this old photo of Malcolm looking all babyish at 4 years old.

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12 years old is special for many reasons. In this country, there is the high stakes Primary School Leaving Examination (PSLE) which drives some parents to go on a year of unpaid leave so that they could stay home to coach their children. It’s the year where they would bid goodbyes to their friends whom they have spent their last 6 years with in Primary school. It’s also the year where theme birthday parties are no longer cool and colourful party decoration are for babies. And for me, I suspect it would be the last time I would be needed at his birthday parties. And that kind of motivated me to throw a birthday party for him.

The party was in the afternoon so I prepared some light snacks for tea. I ordered 40 mini burgers and baked a quiche. Gosh, they could really eat and there’s no such thing as too much food!

I got him to choose some balloons of his favourite colours but soon realised that tween boys didn’t really care much about balloons, they were more interested in releasing the helium filled balloons to see how high they would go!

So my son wanted a cake that looks like a cake, not a car nor a plane or some fanciful designed theme cakes. I heaved a sign of relief that I didn’t have to work with fondant this time. At 12 years old, he had outgrown theme cake and wanted something that looked ‘edible’. It happened to be one of his buddy’s birthday that day and so I baked 2 ‘serious looking’ (or boring looking) cakes, one for each birthday boy. An oreo cheesecake and a 2 layer chocolate cake.

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I got the oreo cheesecake recipe from a friend and the chocolate cake from here. The chocolate buttercream was really easy to work with but as usual I cut back on the amount of sugar. I used slightly less than 2 cups instead of the 3 that the recipe called for. Even so, my boys thought it was sweet. Can’t imagine if I were to go ahead with the recommended amount.

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Most of the boys had 2 servings of the cakes, one of each flavour and they seemed to prefer the cheesecake. One of his friends even requested to pack some home. I was delighted that the cakes turned out so well. All these years of trial and error making birthday cakes sure did something good to my baking skills. The kind of things mothers do. I have surprised myself many times during the last decade.

It was a simple birthday party, exactly what he had asked for, with the boys getting in and out of pool, eating, swimming and running around. I can’t think of a party simpler than this and I hope it would be one of those things that he would one day look back with fond memories.

 

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